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Sidney Myer @ The Laurie Beechman Theater

Sidney Myer @ The Laurie Beechman Theater

Posted Oct 25, 2017

Chuck Jones, the great animation director - and Bugs Bunny auteur - often spoke of two different kinds of comedians, making a distinction between one “who opens a funny door” and the other who “opens a door funny.” Sidney Myer, singer and comic (and bon-vivant) is both: he can sing a song written for laughs, like “Good Advice,” and milk it for all the comic mileage that composer Allan Sherman intended. Yet he can also take a song that was written as something completely, you should forgive the expression, straight, like “It’s So Nice to Have a Man Around the House,” and turn it into a comic tour-de-force. Mr. Myer is among the funniest comedians working today, and it’s a testament to his remarkable individuality that he uses the medium of music, rather than the more predictable format of spoken jokes, as his punchline delivery system. Mr. Myer is so overwhelmingly funny, that whenever he appears, I laugh so hard that milk inevitably comes out of my nose - even when I haven’t been drinking milk to begin with.

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Anything Can Happen in the Theater:
The Songs of Maury Yeston

Anything Can Happen in the Theater: The Songs of Maury Yeston

Updated Oct 24, 2017

“Anything Can Happen in the Theater:
The Songs of Maury Yeston”
featuring: Robert Cuccioli, Alex Getlin, Justin Keyes, Michael Maliakel & Jill Paice
The Triad (Stage 72)
158 West 72nd Street, 212-279-4200
Concluding Saturday (October 21)

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Hornblower Cruises

Hornblower Cruises

Updated Oct 18, 2017

There’s no better way to see New York City than aboard a Hornblower Cruise. Hornblower has the newest fleet of Luxury Yachts on New York Harbor with all cruises providing you with the best views of NYC’s iconic landmarks and sights.

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Don't Miss THE RIDE's Innovative New York City Tours!

Don't Miss THE RIDE's Innovative New York City Tours!

Posted Oct 18, 2017

Drenched in acclaim and awards, the cutting-edge tour experiences offered by THE RIDE represent an experiential entertainment break-through, with a game-changing family of products that has expanded to two Box Offices, several casts and more than 150 employees.


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A Most Memorable Cruise!

A Most Memorable Cruise!

Updated Oct 18, 2017

by Sasha Dimitrijevic

There are very few things, if any, which can outshine the nightlife in NYC. We are surrounded by a variety of spots we would like to be seen at, places to go and mingle, socialize or network and of course there are always those areas we go to, in hopes of meeting someone special. Being in New York, all of these choices are close at hand, convenient and diametrically different.

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The 28th Annual New York Cabaret Convention

The 28th Annual New York Cabaret Convention

Posted Oct 16, 2017

If the late Donald Smith (manager of the legendary Mabel Mercer and creator of the foundation in her name) had not founded the Cabaret Convention in 1989, someone else would have had to have done it; it’s become the kind of event that’s so central to this city’s musical life that we can’t imagine Autumn in New York without it. For over four nights and over 80 different performers altogether, you’ll get to hear just about every worthwhile cabaret artiste (every diva and divo) currently active in the New York scene - and that roster lately goes beyond singers to include the likes of comedian-provocateur Bruce Vilanche and the dazzlingly entertaining jazz violinist Aaron Weinstein. The show that I’m most looking forward personally to is the climactic evening - a celebration of two Great American songwriters, Richard Whiting and Hoagy Carmichael, never before saluted by the Convention, but I wouldn't miss any of the four evenings.

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Rita Wilson @ 
The Cafe Carlyle

Rita Wilson @ The Cafe Carlyle

Posted Oct 11, 2017

“We all need stories,” singer-actress-songwriter (and in other guises, producer, philanthropist, and social activist) tells us at the start of her latest run at the Carlyle. For Ms. Wilson, the daughter of immigrants, those stories take the form of songs that she heard on the radio in the late 1960s and early ‘70s: rock, pop, folk, and country. Her show consists entirely (with one notable exception early on) of originals written more or less in these various period subgenres. normally, both of those factors that might strain the boundaries of what customarily transpires in an intimate supper club space like the Carlyle, but Ms. Wilson works. Her personality is consistently upbeat and engaging, and she narrates the show with well-prepared patter that expertly guides us from one song to another. Near the start, she takes us through two classic country-pop “talking” story songs of the 1960s, “Ode to Billie Joe” and “Harper Valley PTA,” and uses her take on them to springboard into her own material. Many of her numbers (“Big City Small Town Girl”), have an autobiographical angle to them, but they all present different aspects of her story and personality: on “New Girl,” inspired by a friend’s marriage, she’s shattered and humbled, but on “You’re Not the Boss of Me,” she’s empowered and defiant. Some of these songs are on her 2016 album, Rita Wilson, and while her voice has a kind of studio-style perfection on that, I think most listeners would prefer the slightly rough (as she admitted) but infinitely more engaged performances that she gives in front of actual audiences (as well as the witty banter, like “Encore - that’s French for ‘more applause for me.’”), so much so that it would make sense for her to consider recording her next album live at the Carlyle. I’d buy it.

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Jazz Foundation of America - 26th Annual Jazz Loft Party

Jazz Foundation of America - 26th Annual Jazz Loft Party

Posted Oct 8, 2017

For 26 years, this is has been a great, fun party, a most worthy celebration held in honor of an even more worthy cause, the only Foundation that is, as it’s motto reads, “saving jazz, one musician at a time.” Actually, they save a great many more than that at once, and, as you are well aware, what with the devastation in Texas, Florida, and the Caribbean, the need is greater than ever. Mounted by Wendy Oxenhorn, an angel in a mermaid dress who was rightfully named as the jazz advocate of the year by the NEA in 2016, the evening long marathon event artfully intermingles hardcore jazz instrumentalists and singers along with soul and blues artists. The party setting - with copious amounts of food and drink (and probably all your friends as well) everywhere you turn, makes this one of the most copacetic ways to enjoy your favorite music. This year, the top headliners are Gladys Knight, Nona Hendryx, Steve Jordan, and the host is actor Danny Glover. Every year I go, and every year I inevitably run into lots of people that I never see anywhere else; apparently they only attend one jazz event per year. I’d like to encourage them to go to more than that, however, if they are going to pick just one, it’s hard to fault their judgement for selecting this one.

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Tony Bennett @ Radio City Music Hall

Tony Bennett @ Radio City Music Hall

Posted Oct 6, 2017

It’s no secret that the greatest of living American popular singers is at an all-time high, and this is just about a year after celebrating his 90th birthday in 2016. Cheek to Cheek, his 2014 album of duets with Lady Gaga, was the biggest-selling album of his career thus far, while The Silver Lining, an all Jerome Kern set done in tandem with the brilliant pianist Bill Charlap, was the best purely jazz album he’s made since his classic collaborations with Bill Evans 40 years ago.  Whether sharing the stage with his cultural progeny or going it solo, Tony Bennett continues to show us all how it’s done - and proves over and over that life begins at 90. (As an added bonus, his talented daughter Antonia opens the show and duets with him on Stephen Sondheim’s “Old Friend.”)

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Duncan Sheik @ The Cafe Carlyle

Duncan Sheik @ The Cafe Carlyle

Posted Oct 5, 2017

For those Broadway-centric attendees - and Carlyle regulars - the debut of Duncan Sheik at the Cafe Carlyle contains a lot of surprises. Most of us know him through the two shows of his that have thus far made it to Broadway, the Tony-winning Spring Awakening (2006) and American Psycho (2016). The first is about teen anguish (and German teen anguish at that), although it has many gentler moments; the second, well, it’s about American psychos, and uses some very challenging forms of avant-rock to tell its highly-disturbing story (the logo for the show was a set of headphones dripping with blood). However, in person in the intimate space of the Carlyle, much of Mr. Sheik’s music is unexpectedly romantic - and that applies both to his “singer-songwriter” material, those songs he wrote for his eight solo albums (thus far). “Circling” is a compelling, thoughtful ballad, even more so in person than on his latest album, the 2015 Legerdemain. Overall, he and his trio at the Carlyle (with Jason Hart, keyboards, and Doug Yowell, drums), create a lovely minimalist vibe throughout the evening, putting one in mind of film score composers like Carter Burwell. For Broadway buffs, the highlights were the songs like “Mama Who Bore Me,” from Spring Awakening, done as a duo with Kathryn Gallagher. Yet for a goodly portion of the crowd, the song that they came to hear was Mr. Sheik’s biggest pop hit, the 1996 “Barely Breathing,” which served as a perfect encore and closer.

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